Ratings by the Motion Picture Association of America are: (G) for general audiences; (PG) parental guidance urged because of material possibly unsuitable for children; (PG-13) parents are strongly cautioned to give guidance for attendance of children younger than 13; (R) restricted, younger than 17 admitted only with parent or adult guardian; (NC-17) no one 17 and younger admitted.

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(Critics’ Choices capsule reviews are by Kenneth Turan (K.Tu.), Justin Chang (J.C.) and other reviewers. Openings compiled by Kevin Crust.)

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OPENING IN HOLLYWOOD THIS WEEK

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“American Made” — Tom Cruise stars as an unlikely pilot flying secret missions for the CIA. With Domhnall Gleeson, Sarah Wright, E. Roger Mitchell, Jesse Plemons, Lola Kirke. Written by Gary Spinelli. Directed by Doug Liman. (1:55) R.

“Before the Sun Explodes” — A one-time successful comedian in a middle-age funk meets a charming female comic who shakes his perspective. With Bill Dawes, Sarah Butler, Christine Woods. Written by Debra Eisenstadt and Zeke Farrow. Directed by Eisenstadt. (1:20 NR.

“Clive Davis: The Soundtrack of Our Lives” — Documentary on the music impresario and founder of Arista Records. Featuring Davis, Janis Joplin, Carlos Santana, Paul Simon, Art Garfunkel, Bruce Springsteen, Barry Manilow, Aretha Franklin, Whitney Houston. Directed by Chris Perkel. (2:03) NR.

“Different Flowers” — A young Kansas City woman leaves her groom at the altar and embarks on a freewheeling journey with her younger sister. Written and directed by Morgan Dameron. With Emma Bell, Hope Lauren, Shelley Long. (1:39) NR.

“Don’t Sleep” — Young lovers move in together and confront their childhood terrors. With Drea de Matteo, Cary Elwes, Dominic Sherwood. Written and directed by Rick Bieber. (1:35) NR.

“Flatliners” — The fine line between life and death becomes a dangerous obsession for five medical students. With Ellen Page, Diego Luna, Nina Dobrev, James Norton, Kiersey Clemons. Written by Ben Ripley; story by Peter Filardi and Ripley. Directed by Niels Arden Oplev. (1:48) PG-13.

“Heartstone” — In a remote Icelandic village, two teenage boys feel love and loss over a tumultuous summer. With Baldur Einarsson, Blaer Hinriksson, Dilja Valsdottir. Written and directed by Guomundur Arnar Guomundsson. In Icelandic with English subtitles. (2:09) NR.

“Let’s Play Two” — Pearl Jam, led by Chicago Cubs fan Eddie Vedder, plays live at Wrigley Field during the team’s 2016 championship season in this documentary. Directed by Danny Clinch. (2:00) NR.

“Literally, Right Before Aaron” — A man learns his ex-girlfriend is getting married and realizes he is not ready to let go. With Justin Long, Cobie Smulders, Ryan Hansen, John Cho, Kristen Schaal, Dana Delany, Peter Gallagher, Lea Thompson, Luis Guzman. Written and directed by Ryan Eggold. (1:45) NR.

“Loving Vincent” — In the summer of 1891, a man travels to a small French village to investigate the final weeks of artist Vincent Van Gogh in this animated tale in which every frame was painted by hand. Voices include Douglas Booth, Robert Gulaczyk, Saoirse Ronan, Chris O’Dowd. Written by Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman, Jacek Dehnel. Directed by Kobiela, Welchman. (1:35) PG-13.

“Lucky Harry” — Dean Stanton plays a desert-dwelling atheist staring down the end of life. With David Lynch, Ron Livingston, Ed Begley Jr., Tom Skerritt. Written by Logan Sparks, Drago Sumonja. Directed by John Carroll Lynch. (1:28) NR.

“Mark Felt — The Man Who Brought Down the White House” — “Deep Throat,” Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein’s Watergate informant and the associate director of the FBI, risks his family and career and keeps his identity secret for more than 30 years. With Liam Neeson, Diane Lane, Marton Csokas, Josh Lucas, Tony Goldwyn, Michael C. Hall. Written and directed by Peter Landesman. (1:43) PG-13.

“Our Souls at Night” — Jane Fonda and Robert Redford star as longtime neighbors who reach out to each other to bridge the loneliness of their twilight. With Bruce Dern, Judy Greer, Matthias Schoenaerts, Iain Armitage. Written by Scott Neustadter, Michael H. Weber, based on the novel by Kent Haruf. Directed by Ritesh Batra. (1:43) NR.

“Prosperity” — Documentary follows Dr. Pedram Shojai across the U.S. as he studies conscious consumerism and more sustainable ways of living. Directed by Mark van Wijk. (1:20) NR.

“A Question of Faith” — Crises force three families to look to God for help. With Richard T. Jones, Kim Fields, C. Thomas Howell. Written by Ty Manns. Directed by Kevan Otto. PG.

“Realive” — A man is revived 60 years after being diagnosed with a fatal illness and frozen. With Charlotte Le Bon, Oona Chaplin, Tom Hughes. Written and directed by Mateo Gil. (1:52) NR.

“The Sound” — A skeptical writer investigates a supposedly haunted subway station. With Rose McGowan, Christopher Lloyd, Michael Eklund, Richard Gunn. Written and directed by Jenna Mattison. (1:32) NR.

“Spettacolo” — Documentary on Teatro Povero di Monticchiello, an endangered annual event in a town in Tuscany, where villagers turn their lives into drama. Directed by Jeff Malberg and Chris Shellen. (1:31) NR.

“Stopping Traffic: The Movement to End Sex Trafficking” — Filmmaker and Jain monk Sadhvi Siddhali Shree explores this dark underworld through the eyes of survivors, reformed traffickers, veteran activists and front-line rescue/aid organizations in this documentary. (1:19) NR.

“Super Dark Times” — A tragedy drives a wedge between high school best friends leading to horrific violence in upstate New York in the early 1990s. With Owen Campbell, Charlie Tahan, Elizabeth Cappuccino, Max Talisman, Sawyer Barth, Amy Hargreaves. Written by Ben Collins, Luke Piotrowski. Directed by Kevin Phillips. (1:40) NR.

“Take Every Wave: The Life of Laird Hamilton” — Documentary profiles the surfer who dramatically changed the sport. Featuring Gabrielle Reece. Written by Mark Bailey, Jack Youngelson. Directed by Rory Kennedy. (1:58) NR.

“Thirst Street” — An American flight attendant enters into a tempestuous affair with a Parisian bartender. With Lindsay Burdge, Damien Bonnard, Esther Garrel. Written by Nathan Silver and C. Mason Wells. Directed by Silver. (1:23) NR.

“30/Love” — A man channels his grief over losing his wife in childbirth into tennis. With Robert Cannon, Brenda Vaccarro, Justin Lee. Written by Cannon, Ira Heffler. Directed by Cannon. (1:26) NR.

“Til Death Do Us Part” — A woman forges a new identity, a new life and a new love to escape her abusive husband. With Taye Diggs, Annie Ilonzeh, Stephen Bishop, Malik Yoba, Robinne Lee. Directed by Christopher B. Stokes. (1:41) PG-13.

“Two Trains Runnin’ ” — Documentary on the search for an old blues singer in Mississippi during the Freedom Summer of 1964. Written by Benjamin Hedlin. Directed by Sam Pollard. (1:20) NR.

“Unrest” — Ph.D. candidate Jennifer Brea turns the camera on herself to chronicle her battle with chronic fatigue syndrome in this documentary. (1:30) NR.

“Welcome to Willits” — Campers and a pot farmer in Northern California are terrorized by mysterious creatures. With Dolph Lundgren, Karrueche Tran, Rory Culkin. Written by Tim Ryan. Directed by Trevor Ryan. (1:22) NR.

“White Sun” — A man returns to his village in Nepal for his father’s cremation. With Dayahang Rai, Asha Magrati, Rabindra Singh Baniya. Written and directed by Deepak Rauniyar. In Nepali with English subtitles. (1:29) NR.

“Window Horses” — Animated tale about a sheltered young Canadian who is invited to a poetry festival in Iran and is forced to reconsider her past. Written and directed by Ann Marie Fleming. Voices of Sandra Oh, Ellen Page, Shohreh Aghdashloo. (1:29) NR.

“Youth” — Members of a military performing arts group deal with a family scandal, unrequited love and other coming-of-age drama during China’s Cultural Revolution. With Huang Xuan, Miao Miao, Zhong Chuxi, Yang Caiyu. Written by Geling Yan. Directed by Feng Xiaogang. In Mandarin with English subtitles. (2:26) NR.

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CRITICS’ CHOICES

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“Baby Driver” — Edgar Wright’s exuberant, one-of-a-kind vehicular-action-thriller-musical-romance stars Ansel Elgort as a tinnitus-afflicted, music-loving getaway driver alongside a superb supporting cast that includes Kevin Spacey, Lily James, Jamie Foxx, Jon Hamm and Eiza Gonzalez. (J.C.) R.

“The Big Sick” — Kumail Nanjiani and Zoe Kazan are terrific as a young couple navigating the challenges of interracial romance and Muslim immigrant identity in director Michael Showalter's delightful, serious-minded comedy, which also features powerhouse supporting turns from Holly Hunter and Ray Romano. (J.C.) R.

“Brad’s Status” — Mike White’s smart, empathetic new comedy of despair follows a middle-age man (Ben Stiller, giving one of his best performances) who can’t resist the urge to compare himself with his more successful friends. (J.C.) R.

“Columbus” — John Cho and Haley Lu Richardson play two strangers who go on a walking-and-talking tour of the modernist architecture in Columbus, Ind., in this serenely intelligent, gorgeously contemplative first feature from writer-director Kogonada. (J.C.) NR.

“Dunkirk” — Both intimate and epic, as emotional as it is tension-filled, Christopher Nolan’s immersive World War II drama is being ballyhooed as a departure for the bravura filmmaker, but in truth the reason it succeeds so masterfully is that it is anything but. (K.Tu.) PG-13.

“Girls Trip” — Regina Hall, Jada Pinkett Smith, Queen Latifah and a revelatory Tiffany Haddish play four women renewing the bonds of friendship on a New Orleans weekend getaway in this hilariously raunchy and sensationally assured new comedy from director Malcolm D. Lee (“The Best Man”). (J.C.) R.

“Good Time” — Robert Pattinson gives a revelatory performance as a scuzzy small-time crook going nowhere very fast in this moody, relentless and impeccably observed New York thriller directed by Josh and Benny Safdie. (J.C.) R.

“mother!” — Jennifer Lawrence plays the young wife of a poet (Javier Bardem) besieged by a number of unexpected visitors in this darkly exhilarating house-of-horrors thriller written and directed by Darren Aronofsky. (J.C.) R.

“School Life” — The story of a year in the life of an Irish boarding school and two of its veteran teachers is as charming, intimate and warmhearted an observational documentary as you’d ever want to see. (K.Tu.) NR.

“War for the Planet of the Apes” — An eerie quiet descends over this grim and masterful third “Planet of the Apes” prequel, directed with bleak beauty by Matt Reeves (“Dawn of the Planet of the Apes”) and crowned by another superb performance-capture turn from Andy Serkis as the soulful chimpanzee Caesar. (Justin Chang) PG-13.

“Wind River” — Jeremy Renner and Elizabeth Olsen star in the most accomplished violent thriller in recent memory, a tense tale of murder on a Native American reservation made with authenticity, plausibility and wall-to-wall filmmaking skill by writer-director Taylor Sheridan. (K.Tu.) R.

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©2017 Los Angeles Times

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