100 years ago, Sept. 23, 1917

Sunday. No paper.

50 years ago, 1967

MATTOON -- James F. Conyers, son of Milton E. Conyers of Mattoon, has been named one of the first Peace Corps volunteers to be sent to the West Africa nation of Gambia. Conyers, one of 18 new Peace Corps volunteers, is scheduled to arrive with the first Peace Corps contingent to that country at the end of September. The Peace Corps program in Gambia will focus primarily on improving vocational and agricultural skills. Conyers graduated from Eastern Illinois University earlier this year with a bachelor's degree in education... WASHINGTON -- The Johnson administration drew a curtain of silence over the question of whether Secretary of State Dean Rusk had raised with President Johnson the possibility of Rusk resigning because of his daughter's interracial marriage. Rusk said he would have no comment on a published report that he was prepared to resign if the the marriage proved embarrassing to the administration. Margaret Rusk, 18, a student at Stanford University, was married Thursday to 22-year-old Guy Gibson Smith, a June graduate of Georgetown University in Washington and an officer in the Air Force Reserves. He is a Negro.

25 years ago, 1992

CHARLESTON -- Having known every sitting president of Eastern Illinois University except its first -- Livingston Lord -- Dr. Mack Hollowell looks forward to casting his vote Thursday for the seventh. His children’s great-grandfather, on their mother’s side, was one of the original trustees of the Eastern Illinois State Normal School, as EIU was called when created by the Illinois Legislature in 1895. Now, almost 100 years later, Hollowell, a Charleston resident and Board of Governors Universities trustee, will help select the next EIU president. Scott Burgett, the grandfather of Hollowell’s first wife, was appointed to the institution’s first board in 1895. CHARLESTON -- Inmates of the Coles County jail recently harvested their garden, located about one mile west of Ashmore. Even after a July 19 hail storm, the garden was a success, Sheriff Jim Kimball said. Tomatoes, peppers, cauliflower, melons and other vegetables were added to inmates’ meals. Servistar Corp. supplied many of the tools used in preparing and maintaining the garden.

100 years ago, Sept. 24, 1917

MATTOON -- Deputy Sheriff Slover returned this morning from Camp Taylor in Kentucky, having gone with Emery Hill, the Lafayette Township young man who failed to report when Coles County's second contingent departed for the south last week. Hill, according to the deputy sheriff, having reported for service at camp voluntarily, may not be punished. Slover said he found the Coles County men enjoying camp life. They drill for eight hours each day, except Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays. They are off Wednesday and Saturday afternoons and all day Sunday. John Marley is acting top sergeant. Sergeants under him are Joe Gray, J.E. Hill, Orlie Rue, Donald Johnston, Clifford Hite, Martin Scharer and Eugene Morrison... MATTOON -- Clerk Lantz of the Coles County exemption board has certified to Adjutant General Dickson at Springfield the names of six colored young men of the county who are eligible under the draft act, having been selected from the 1,000 young men who have appeared before the local board. These young men are not being sent to Camp Taylor, along with the white young men, but will be sent to another camp, not yet decided upon. The six young men are Wade Scott of Terry, Miss., who has been working on a farm in Coles County; Charles H. Wilson, John Emil Barnett, John Lee and Frank W. Franklin, all of Mattoon; and Moke Owens, Charleston... PARIS -- American troops for the first time are under German fire in France. Two American soldiers have been slightly wounded. They were struck by fragments of a blasting shell. A certain contingent of the American Army is now located directly behind the British lines, well within range of the enemy's guns.

50 years ago, 1967

Sunday. No paper.

25 years ago, 1992

CHARLESTON -- For the rest of the week, the sight of covered wagons and people riding horseback will be somewhat common in Coles County. Arriving here yesterday on a trek that started two years ago but which proceeds for only a single week each September was a Kentucky-based group that’s retracing the path traveled by Abraham Lincoln. The Lincoln Wagon Trail organization formed near Lincoln’s birthplace in Kentucky, and has since wound through that state and Indiana, where Lincoln also lived. The 16 covered wagons and accompanying riders reached Charleston midday yesterday. The group left Lawrence County, Ill., late last week and will end this stage of the expedition Saturday at a farm near Sullivan. Next year’s final leg will be to Lincoln’s burial site in Springfield… CHARLESTON -- Can you guess which state has the most Eastern Illinois University alumni? OK, Illinois (36,282 of EIU’s 60,716 living alums). But which states rank in the top five? According to the EIU Alumni Association, Indiana ranks second in the number of alumni with California, Missouri and Florida completing the top five states in the number of alumni residents. The university also has room to improve on its record of EIU Foundation giving. Figures released Friday show that just 30 percent of alumni are donors to the university. That means about 42,500 of the living alumni have yet to contribute to the Foundation, which provides scholarships and other financial support.

100 years ago, Sept. 25, 1917

MATTOON -- Broomcorn of the 1917 crop went to the $350 mark today when Reynolds & Co. bought 12 tons and 398 pounds, the product of 32 acres from the L.J. Groniger farm just northeast of Mattoon, paying with a check for $4,109.34. The seller was Aaron Arthur, tenant on the farm. The straight brush brought $350 an acre and the rest slightly under that figure. This is the first instance of a price as high as $350, but it is said on good authority that several farmers have been outspoken in their intentions to hold for the $400 mark before they let loose of their holdings... OAKLAND -- "Hello" girls are becoming as scarce in these diggins as fresh country butter. The Oakland Ledger newspaper said it was necessary for Oakland to import a young lady or two from Charleston to work as telephone operators to fill up the depleted ranks at the local office. Then a Macedonian cry came from Kansas station for "hello" girls, stating they would accept them long or lean, stout or fat, married or single, just so they were neither deaf nor dumb and could say "number please" and "the line is busy." ...

50 years ago, 1967

MATTOON -- The U.S. Interior Department has indicated it cannot complete its study of the proposed Lincoln Lake and Lincoln Homestead National Homestead Area until next spring, Congressman William L. Springer said today. Springer said he received a letter from Interior's acting director of the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation who said the bureau needs more information on the size of the proposed Lincoln Lake reservoir area and the operating pool level of the reservoir which will not be available from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers until next April at the earliest... MATTOON -- Barring some unforeseen calamity, Coles County farmers this fall will harvest record soybean and corn crops. Farm Adviser Louis Christen predicted that this year's crops will surpass the record yields of 1965. Christen expects the soybean crop to produce a countywide average of more than 34 bushels an acre. The record is 29 bushels an acre. The magic figure of an average yield of 100 bushels per acre is expected to be topped by the corn crop. The county record is 99 bushels an acre. Last year's county yield averages were 24 bushels an acre for soybeans and 72 bushels per acre for corn.

25 years ago, 1992

CHARLESTON -- A large crowd jumped to its feet as David L. Jorns entered the University Ballroom of the Eastern Illinois University Union last night just before being named the seventh president of Eastern Illinois University. The formal announcement was made a few minutes later when the Board of Governors Universities trustees unanimously approved a motion by Dr. Mack Hollowell to appoint Jorns the next president. Jorns, vice president for academic affairs at Northern Kentucky University, was selected over three other finalists. Barbara Hill, who has been acting in a presidential capacity at EIU for two months, was appointed acting president by BGU trustees. She will serve as acting president until Jorns assumes responsibilities by Jan. 1… CHICAGO -- Trailmobile Inc. has announced plans to build a plant at Jonesboro, Ark. Employees of the Charleston plant received notice of the plans this week. A company spokesman said the project will not result in the transfer of any jobs or otherwise affect the Charleston plant. Trailmobile manufactures semi-tractor trailers and the Charleston plant employs about 900 people. The company is owned by Indonesia interests… NEW YORK -- Baseball’s executive council rescinded National League realignment yesterday, a move that was expected following the resignation of Commissioner Fay Vincent. The Chicago Cubs had obtained a preliminary injunction blocking realignment, which would have moved the Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals to the National League West and the Atlanta Braves and Cincinnati Reds to the NL East.

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