Mr. Rust, in regard to your Football Numbers article, all editorial and grammatical issues aside, I was very disappointed with your biased tone and poor statement of facts. Quoting a small part of a study that was done without a control group and primarily dealt with long time professional athletes, as opposed to college or high school athletes was inflammatory. Good high school coaches teach their players very emphatically that their helmets are not weapons or safeguards against concussions. They also teach their players to keep eyes up and head away to avoid contact. It has been a point of emphasis in our film room to note when a player fails to do this as an educational opportunity for the team. Education on concussion diagnosis is a part of every coaches and players training. More are reported because we are better now at recognizing them and caring for our players who have them. The suggestion that parents need to worry about their child “losing it mentally” is frankly an offensive jab at mental illness issues and a scare tactic. Our job as coaches, and I have been doing this for over 25 years, is to teach young athletes discipline, control and respect. Winning is a wonderful byproduct of successfully doing that, but not the end goal. Spearing is illegal in football. It has been since 1971 at the national level. Two minutes of research would have shown you that. In fact, it has been expanded to include a variation called targeting in the past few years. Go check out the NFHS website. Then print a retraction. Another five minutes would have shown that for high schools and most colleges, football is not a moneymaker. It is not and has never been a money driven sport at those levels.

William Ault, Toledo

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