The tax bill Congress was in such a lather to ram down the middle classes throat will benefit the rich -- I guess it is to be expected when the billionaires have threatened the comfortable careers of politicians.

The message has been clear: you want to continue drawing $174,000 a year for an average of 162 days of work (senator) and 138 days of work (representative); 80 percent of your salary upon retirement; a great health insurance policy; a healthy serving of perks (“How about a trip abroad, courtesy of taxpayers -- the folks who are trying to put bread on the table, send the kids to college, and retire with a few bucks in the bank?”).

At one time, I opposed term limits. Hey, I would tell those who favored term limits, “If, I think an office holder is doing a good job, why should I be denied the right to vote for the guy (or gal)?” Simple enough. Actually, a great argument I thought. And, I believed it; really believed it.

I never took into account the big money folks. We don’t elect senators and representatives; they are bought and paid for with huge checks and expectations. So, do not expect anything for the little guy. We live on a dream, you and I, a dream of a democracy in which we are all treated as equals. The dream is dying folks. It may already be dead.

We are heading full speed toward oligarchy: big men with big money. They are greedy, quite willing to stiff the working class. If you do not believe me, take a hard look at the tax bill. What is ironic is the fact that the conservatives in Congress are willing to accept the more than $1 trillion that will be tacked on to the national debt.

These are the same people who howled for so long about the deficit. How they howled. Now -- running up the tab is no big deal -- the economy will roar like a lion and the money will trickled down to the middle class and life will be milk and honey. Do not kid yourself. The money will only fatten the wallets of the very rich.

Want to end the cycle? Want to give the little guy a chance? Term limits are not perfect, but they increase the odds the person you send to that cushy job in Washington, D.C. will, maybe, just maybe, do what is best for their constituents. Perhaps, become statesmen; perhaps, live up to the aspirations the Founding Fathers believed could be fulfilled.

Hah, tis a dream. In this environment greed trumps aspirations.

Harry Reynolds, Mattoon

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