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FACTS FOR FAMILIES: Learn to meditate, learn to celebrate
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FACTS FOR FAMILIES

FACTS FOR FAMILIES: Learn to meditate, learn to celebrate

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Cheri Burcham

As this pandemic continues, U of I Extension staff, including myself, continue working remotely from home providing education the best and safest way we can. Whether it is news articles, social media posts, webinars, or good old-fashioned mail, we have done our best to keep in contact with our county residents and provide the research-based information that you trust and can use. It is looking as though we will continue to work from home through the month of July and may return the middle of August, but are still here for you by phone at 217-345-7034, e-mail at uie-ccdms@illinois.edu or at our website at https://extension.illinois.edu/ccdms. My e-mail is cburcham@illinois.edu if you have a question for me. Please continue to stay safe and healthy out there!

FACTS FOR FAMILIES: Maintaining boundaries between work and home life

We have some great interns working through the Champaign office this summer and here is a great article by U of I Extension family life intern Kelly McCasland. She says: between the chaos of work, balancing your family activities, and keeping up with household chores, when do you find the time for yourself? Do you check in with your mental well- being often? When do you find the time to relax?

Meditation has been described as a “mind-body complementary medicine” by Mayo Clinic. Meditation is an easy and peaceful way to reconnect with your mind and give yourself time to sort through your thoughts. The emotional and physical benefits of meditation are long lasting, even when you have completed meditating.

The emotional benefits of meditation include increased self-awareness, imagination, creativity, patience and tolerance. They also include gaining new perspectives in stressful situations.

Meditation can also help with the physical symptoms of anxiety, depression, asthma, cancer, chronic pain, hypertension, irritable bowel syndrome and migraines.

There are many types of meditation you can try. From a mental aspect, guided, mantra, and mindfulness meditations are all forms of meditation done inside your own mind. You use your thoughts to visualize peaceful things, think about calming phrases, or increase your awareness of living in a present moment and accepting it. On a physical level, there are options to meditate using physical motion. Qi gong, Tai chi, and yoga are great options to relax your body and mind and reconnect them as one.

But, what about finding time to meditate? Most beginners meditate for a few minutes at a time. When your alarm goes off in the morning or right before bed, try mindfulness meditation. Accepting that moment and bringing in positive thoughts can start or end your day on a happy note. While you’re stuck in traffic or singing in the shower, try a guided meditation or envision a calming place. These simple methods may go a long way in helping you de-stress!

For more information on University of Illinois Unit 19 programming and to read more helpful articles, visit our website at https://extension.illinois.edu/ccdms , call us at 217-345-7034 or contact Cheri Burcham at cburcham@illinois.edu. Also visit the Family Files Blog at https://extension.illinois.edu/blogs/family-files.


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