{{featured_button_text}}

CHARLESTON -- Police say a Charleston man struck a house with his car at 2:50 a.m. May 25 at 302 W. Polk Ave.

According to a police report, Emmanuel Simmons, 22, hit the home, causing damage to the porch railing and foundation brick.

According to the report, Simmons told police he was traveling southbound on C Street at 30 mph and could not stop at the stop intersection because of an issue with his brakes. He then collided with the property.

The report said Simmons then backed up across the street, over curb and into a neighbor's yard. A marked city street sign was knocked over and bent to the ground. However, Simmons denies any knowledge of hitting the street sign, according to the report. 

Keep reading for FREE!
Enjoy more articles by signing up or logging in. No credit card required.

Simmons then fled the area westbound and ran off the roadway near the 1600 block of West Polk Avenue where there was a sharp left hand turn. The vehicle stopped 200 feet from the roadway, the report says. 

According to police, he was located by an Eastern Illinois University officer walking from his vehicle. 

Simmons was cited with driving under the influence of alcohol, leaving the scene of an accident and operating uninsured motor vehicle. 

No injuries were reported as a result of the crash. 

Sign up for our Crime & Courts newsletter

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Contact Jarad Jarmon at (217) 238-6839. Follow him on Twitter: @JJarmonReporter

0
0
0
0
2

Reporter

Jarad Jarmon is a reporter for the JG-TC. He covers the city of Charleston, Eastern Illinois University, Mattoon schools and the Regional Office of Education.

Subscribe to the JG-TC

Reporting like this is brought to you by a staff of experienced local journalists committed to telling the stories of your community.
Support from subscribers is vital to continue our mission.

Become a subscriber

Thank you for subscribing

Your contribution makes local journalism possible.

Load comments