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CHARLESTON -- One of two men arrested last month for burglarizing a Mattoon home was sentenced to prison when he admitted to taking part in the break-in.

Philip W. Swiech, 38, of Mattoon, pleaded guilty to a residential burglary charge.

Swiech and Brian E. Willenborg were arrested in connection with the Feb. 18 break-in of a home in the 800 block of Wabash Avenue in Mattoon.

With the agreement reached in his case, Swiech was sentenced to prison for four years, which was the minimum sentence possible. A residential burglary conviction requires a prison term of four to 15 years without the option for probation.

Records in the case indicate the homeowner discovered damage to the residence's back door and found that three TVs, a stereo and tools were missing.

Police were available to obtain video of the burglary from a nearby business' security system and that led to the identification of the two suspects, the records say. Swiech and Willenborg both admitted to the burglary when questioned, they say.

With the conviction, Swiech also received a record of unsuccessfully completing a probation sentence he received for a 2017 methamphetamine possession conviction.

Coles County Circuit Judge James Glenn imposed the sentence by accepting the terms of a plea agreement that State's Attorney Jesse Danley and Public Defender Anthony Ortega recommended.

Willenborg, 38, of Mattoon, was also charged with residential burglary and his case is pending.

In other cases in court before Glenn recently:

  • Danielle E. Barker, 29, of Bloomington, pleaded guilty to a methamphetamine possession charge accusing her of having the drug on Dec. 20.
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Case records indicate that methamphetamine was found on Barker after a traffic stop on Interstate 57 in Coles County.

She was sentenced to two years in prison for the conviction that could have brought up to a six-year prison term. Barker was eligible for twice the usual maximum sentence because of prior convictions.

Her prison sentence will run at the same time as one she received in McLean County for a theft conviction. She also received a record of unsuccessfully completing the probation sentence she received for a 2016 Coles County methamphetamine possession conviction.

Glenn accepted a plea agreement that Danley and Ortega recommended.

  • Chad E. Lucas, 44, of Mattoon, was sentenced to 2 1/2 years of probation for having methamphetamine on March 31.

Lucas pleaded guilty in January to a possession charge alleging he had the drug found during a traffic stop in Mattoon.

He was eligible for up to 10 years in prison, twice the normal maximum, because of a Champaign County methamphetamine conviction. When Lucas pleaded guilty, however, the prosecution agreed to ask for no more than two years in prison.

Glenn sentenced Lucas after hearing recommendations from Assistant State's Attorney Joy Wolf and Ortega.

  • Kerry I. Lowry, 30, formerly of Toledo, pleaded guilty to a charge of possession of a controlled substance.

Case records indicate that cocaine and marijuana were found in Lowry's possession during a traffic stop in Charleston on June 16.

She was sentenced to two years of first offender probation, meaning there is a chance for no record of a conviction if she completes it successfully.

Wolf and defense attorney Sean Britton recommended the plea agreement.

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Contact Dave Fopay at (217) 238-6858. Follow him on Twitter: @FopayDave

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Dave Fopay is a reporter for the JG-TC who covers Coles County, the local court system, Charleston schools and more.

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