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100 years ago, Jan. 20, 1918

Sunday. No paper.

50 years ago, 1968

WINDSOR -- The main line of the New York Central Railroad between Indianapolis and St. Louis is open today after crews worked through the night to clear the wreckage of a 13-car derailment in the center of Windsor. Railroad officials announced this morning that damage to the train, cargo and track has been placed at $229,500. The 68-car train, traveling an estimated 50 mph through Windsor, derailed at 2:20 p.m. yesterday. Cause of the derailment points to a bolster on the 15th car from the rear. About 1,000 feet of track was torn by the derailing cars. One of the strewn cars was jammed into the Neal-Cooper Grain Elevator, ripping into a grain bin containing an estimated 4,000 bushels of corn. A second car, loaded with 15 new Chevrolet automobiles, rammed the Windsor Supply Co. lumber yard... MATTOON -- The recent cold snap has affected motorists and service stations. A check with just six service stations finds that since Jan. 1 they have had 2,470 calls for assistance. One station manager said they had assisted 800 motorists since the first of the year with another 500 callers turned down because they just didn't have the staff to get to all of them. 

25 years ago, 1993

CHARLESTON -- Joker’s was denied a license to sell hard liquor or packaged alcohol yesterday. The Charleston City Council voted 5-0 against an ordinance that would have reclassified two of the city’s Class C licenses that authorize the sale of wine and beer only. The proposal would have reclassified one C license into a Class A license, permitting the sale of hard liquor and packaged alcohol. This request was made by Donna Bickers who owns Joker’s on Fourth Street. The other Class C license would have been changed to a Class D restaurant license and would have gone to Don Yost of Stix, also on Fourth Street. Mayor Wayne Lanman asked City Attorney Brian Bower to draft a separate ordinance for the restaurant license request… CHARLESTON -- School children will get a first-hand look at the Civil War era this spring, following Charleston school board action last night. The board voted 6-0, with member Debbie Niven absent, to allow a troop of Civil War re-enactors to conduct a demonstration on the grounds of Jefferson Elementary School the weekend of May 1. The re-enactors, led by Robert Leinweber of Havana, a friend of Jefferson art teacher Pat Mahler, will camp overnight April 30. Superintendent Bill Hill said the encampment will correspond with course work for fifth-grade classes, all of which are at Jefferson.

100 years ago, Jan. 21, 1918

MATTOON -- The new Illinois Central Railroad passenger station in Mattoon, which was in course of construction for more than a year, was put into service this morning, its doors being opened for the first to the general public for its inspection and use. Visitors found everything connected with the plant beyond their expectations. the main entrance is through three big double swinging doors off of Broadway. The Van Noy restaurant is separated from the main entrance by a plate glass front. The wide stairway leading from the main entrance to the general waiting room is constructed of re-enforced concrete with ornamental steel and wood hand rails. There are two landings. The general waiting room is on the first floor, subway level, 32 feet wide and 55 feet long. The south end contains a retiring room and toilet room for women, as well as a smoking room for men... CHARLESTON -- W.H. Kerrick, special investigator for the department of justice, was in Charleston Saturday to investigate alleged disloyal utterances by Miss Emma Shasbarger and Professor Frederick Koch, a member of the Eastern Illinois State Normal School faculty, following complaints filed. Miss Shasbarger was told by Kerrick that she had not joined the Red Cross effort and had made some disloyal utterances, as alleged in the complaint, as being very pro-German. Kerrick gave her some strong advice and told her she should become a member of the Red Cross and not talk against the government and in favor of its enemies. Mr. Koch was told that a complaint had been filed against him. Mr. Kerrick stated that he had investigated the matter and found that Mr. Koch had purchased Liberty bonds, had subscribed to the Red Cross and Army YMCA work. Mr. Kerrick said he believed that Mr. Koch was a loyal citizen but was compelled to invesigate the complaint.

50 years ago, 1968

Sunday. No paper.

25 years ago, 1993

CHARLESTON -- Chris McGilliard never broke a sweat when he was asked to spell “Indianapolis.” It was the tie-breaking word that earned him the championship of the Dennis Cougill Memorial Spelling Bee at the Greenwood School Museum at Eastern Illinois University. Ten students, all from Jefferson Elementary School, representing each fifth-grade class, competed in the bee. Shayna Hackett was the second-place finisher while Dale Metzger placed third. Ten students participated in the spelling bee… CHARLESTON -- The driver of a car involved in an accident that killed four people on Dec. 26 had a blood-alcohol level nearly twice the legal limit, a Coles County coroner’s jury was told yesterday. The car driven by Alan W. Loy, 29, of Edgewood had been moving erratically prior to the accident on Interstate 57 about four miles south of the Illinois Route 16 exit. The Loy vehicle traveled 182 feet from the northbound lane, through the median before it hit a southbound minivan driven by Mary Beth Christoff, 43, of Memphis, Tenn., state trooper J.K. Purviance said. Loy, a passenger in his car, Christoff and her husband, Kurt, all died in the incident. Loy had a blood alcohol level of .193, Coroner John Schilling said. The Christoffs three children were injured but since have been released from a Chicago-area hospital… WASHINGTON -- William Jefferson Clinton was inaugurated as the 42nd president of the United States yesterday before a cheering crowd of a quarter-million people, bringing a new generation to power and pledging “to face hard truths and take strong steps.” Clinton used the word “change” 11 times and promised his Democratic administration would end the “deadlock and drift” of government.

100 years ago, Jan. 22, 1918

MATTOON -- Rev. F.J. Compson, rector of the Mattoon Episcopal Church, was the purchaser of the first ticket sold from the ticket office at the new Illinois Central Railroad passenger station. Mr. Compson bought a ticket to Champaign at 10:45 o'clock yesterday morning after first going into the old ticket office in the Essex House. He expects to retain the rebate check as a souvenir... MATTOON -- The Essex House, after serving for half a century as a hotel and passenger station, has been closed, the last of its tenants, the news stand of the Van Noy Company, having moved to the general waiting room of the new Illinois Central Railroad passenger station. In closing the Essex House, the last public loafing place of Mattoon's unemployed has been dispensed with. Loafing will not be tolerated in the new passenger station, according to company officials. It is reported the old building will be wrecked early in the spring to make room for further improvements... CHARLESTON -- The military exemption board of Coles County began this morning the physical examination of those of the selective draft age who were placed in the first class, following the filing of their questionnaires. Two hundred men were summoned for examination today. An additional 200 have been summoned for tomorrow. Examinations are being conducted in the Coles County Supervisors' partments in the courthouse. The examining board is made up of the following physicians: Dr. F.E. Bell and Dr. C.E. Morgan, both of Mattoon; Dr. H.A. Shaffer, Dr. M.W. Bisson and Dr. C.E. Greer, Charleston; Dr. C.H. Harwood, Janesville; and Dr. O.T. Allen, Ashmore.

50 years ago, 1968

MATTOON -- The headquarters of the 816th Quartermaster Company of the U.S. Army Reserve has been shifted to an Army Reserve center in Fairfield. The move, accomplished Sunday morning, marked the end of the Army Reserve history in Mattoon. The Mattoon unit received orders to evacuate its Mattoon base in the reorganization of the Army Reserves order by Defense Secretary Robert McNamara. In 1955, the first reserve unit was established in Mattoon. It was the First Artillery and was headquartered at 2921 Shelby. In 1961, the First Artillery and the 102nd Infantry consolidated with the 816th and 12th Special Forces. The units moved to rented facilities on South U.S. Route 45... ARCOLA -- Officials in Arcola, dismayed over the prospect that the entire segment of Interstate 57 must be completed before any shorter section is opened, have registered their concern with state officials. The Illinois Division of Highways recently let a $7.6 million two-year contract for the Humboldt to Tuscola section and reportedly indicated that I57 would not be opened until October 1969 when the entire Mattoon-to-Tuscola highway is completed. Arcola Mayor Harry Smith said he hoped the Humboldt to Tuscola segment could be paved first so the Humboldt to Mattoon section could be opened to traffic later this year. Smith cited the "number of deaths" on Route 45 between Arcola and Mattoon (eight in 1967) as a prime reason for opening I57 as soon as possible.

25 years ago, 1993

TOLEDO -- At least two people were injured, one after jumping from a second floor apartment, as fire destroyed a building on the Toledo square last night. The blaze started about 9 p.m. in the second floor of the Bumble Bee Boutique building on the east side of the square. Flames shot through the roof of the building as smoke and fire engulfed the structure for more than an hour. The two injured people were treated in the emergency room at Sarah Bush Lincoln Health Center… MATTOON -- The state no longer considers Mattoon schools “in financial difficulty.” Mattoon was one of four school districts the state Board of Education removed from the list yesterday, a little more than four years after Mattoon was one of eight original districts cited as having the most severe financial problems in Illinois. Gary Ey, assistant state superintendent, said Mattoon improved its financial status by closing buildings, raising taxes and cutting expenditures. Mattoon has whittled its short-term and long-term debut down to about $800,000 from $9 million in four years… CHARLESTON -- After 19 years at Eastern Illinois University, Vaughn Jaenike, dean of the College of Fine Arts since 1974, will retire at the end of this month. During his tenure as the only dean the College of Fine Arts has had, he organized the first “Celebration: A Festival of the Arts” in 1977, was instrumental in the planning and construction of the Tarble Arts Center and secured grants to establish a folk arts program and collection at Tarble.

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