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This week, I had a “Me, too,” moment as I sat on the end of my bed getting dressed. When my husband and I first started dating, he sketched a simple baseball player dressed in a cap and striped uniform. The shirt on the young boy says, “Aces” right across the chest. Under his feet, my husband wrote, “Sure am glad I caught you.” As I read the familiar sentiment, in my mind I replied, “Me, too,” without realizing the connection to what has become a movement today.

My “me, too,” means something different from the terrible stories so many women are finally sharing. Thankfully, the man who caught me loved me and remained happy with “his catch” over our 46 years -- and told me so. He was a physical education teacher, working alongside women and men who talked about how they learned from him and respected him. Unfortunately, an official at his school, a married man, was known to treat the young office ladies in sexually inappropriate ways. I imagine stories could be told about him that would easily fit into the “me, too,” movement.

At this moment, it is and has been important for women, some very young, to tell their stories, many bringing down very powerful, rich men because these ladies have spoken truth to power. Sexually improper behavior is pervasive, destructive and definitely not loving no matter what it may claim. However, after my moment responding to my husband’s words, it occurred to me that perhaps we need to also be reminded that many men all around us, maybe our husbands, bosses, neighbors, favorite celebrities, are not men behaving badly. No, they treat others respectfully in what they say and what they do.

Looking at my husband’s words of love remind me how fortunate I have been.

Rayma Laughlin, Charleston

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